Boot camp

I never thought I would like, let alone own camo clothing, That is until boot camp. Up until then, I wouldn’t have owned anything camo had it not been for my oldest son’s wedding when all the girls wore camo tanks to get their hair done.

After one of the leaders for Beat Cancer Boot Camp – Wisconsin hurt his knee, I started leading sessions in his abscence…and bought camo paratrooper pants (very comfortable I admit) in the process.

I stumbled across BCBC while going through physical therapy after surgery to remove lymph nodes for metastatic melanoma in 2013. My therapist, Colleen, was (is) amazing, and she brought BCBC to Wisconsin a few years ago. It was the flier in the ProHealth physical therapy office that caught my attention.

Years before I was diagnosed, I had been covering an event (I’m a photographic journalist) where I saw something about a cancer boot camp. I remember thinking, “Boot camp would be so cool,” but I didn’t ‘qualify’ as I had no cancer. Be careful what you wish for.

As a runner, I joined BCBC to stay strong and become stronger, since melanoma and Yervoy were knocking me down a few pegs on the fitness ladder. What I found was a support network, a community that empowers cancer patients to become strong, that supports each other, that allows us to talk freely about our journeys (if we want and usually during coffee after Saturday morning sessions) because everyone there understands what the other is going through.

The beauty of BCBC is that every exercise is offered at different levels, depending on where each person is at in their cancer journey, yet the regime is based on Navy SEAL training. While most of the participants are cancer patients, along with a few cancer therapists; BCBC is open to family and friends of cancer patients.

When I started BCBC, I was going through Yervoy treatment in a clinical trial. While the side effects with Yervoy are not as severe as some other treatments, inflammation is right at the top as one of the biggest challenges I faced, magnifying muscle pain to an intense burning sensation.

During that time, I could barely jump or run without pain or much discomfort, yet I refused to sit idly by and wait for treatment to end. Incorporating some of the boot camp exercises into my daily workouts, I became stronger and probably more overall fit than I had been before my melanoma diagnosis.

As the BCBC slogan says, it’s “for strength, for health, for life.” I am no longer exercising to complete a certain distance during each run. I am exercising to add miles to my life. I am exercising to gain overall fitness, not just running fitness. I am exercising for a strong heart and a stronger head, knowing every ounce of muscle gained, is that much more for fighting cancer.

Moving away from my last treatment in July 2014, inflammation continues to decrease, allowing me to participate more fully in each session. When asked to lead some sessions, I’ve gained a new perspective standing in front of the group.

I see the different levels. I see the different struggles. I want participants to know it wasn’t that long ago, I struggled too. I hurt, sometimes even cried in pain. I pushed on. I want each participant to see that they have the potential to do the same. I want each person to know that the best version of themselves is one push up, one plank, one crunch away and you can build on that each day, each week.

BCBC troops are brave, bold and will do more than survive. With boot camp, we will thrive. And proudly wear camo.

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